“After the Inferno” Out Now!

TheBadThings_after_the_inferno_cover
We are pleased as hell to announce the release of our fourth full-length CD “After the Infeno” available on Silent City Records at the following outlets:

Online

Knick Knack Records

CD Baby

Bandcamp (Download only)

iTunes (Download only)

Seattle Area 

Silver Platters (SoDo, Northgate and Bellevue locations)

Georgetown Records (Georgetown)

Easy Street Records (West Seattle)

Sonic Boom Records (Ballard)

Or, at our CD Release Party this Friday, September 19 at Columbia City Theater with The Gloria Darlings opening up the mainstage at 10pm and The Mongrel Jews getting things going out in the Bourbon Bar at 9pm. Get your tickets here now as they’re going fast!

The band will also congregate in the Bourbon Bar after our set to hear a closing set from The Mongrel Jews and to sell and sign CD’s and merch in addition to kinoodling with our adoring fans. Come out and say hi.

Enjoy the new album! It’s been a long time coming.

“Death of the Inferno” – Final Preview Until Release Day!

"After the Inferno" CD Release Party - September 2014

Well folks, here it is! The final track and the final preview from After the Inferno, our classic show closer “Death of the Inferno”. We always wanted to re-record this one since it’s changed musically and collected so much more meaning over the last decade of playing it live. I think this version finally captures the intensity of the live performances.

It also features guest vocals from Bill and Melissa from the late great Bat Country, Emma and Devon of Gunstreet Glory and Robert Rial of Bakelite 78. An honor to have such great voices on our album. Truly.

The positive press keeps rolling in. Morton Shlabtonik from Milwaukee’s Shepherd Express said: “The Bad Things are an Americana group with a particular perspective, which includes conjuring ghosts of the city’s militant past—a place that outsiders from old weird America called home. Recorded with stringed acoustic instruments, accordion, gently brushed drums and even a softly intoned trumpet here and there, The Bad Things bring a contemporary sensibility to folk music.”

And the Midwest Book Review said: “After the Inferno…treads the tenuous border between love and destruction. Songs resonate with a touch of sadness for the tragedies of the past, but also build upon renewed hope for the future. Intense and powerful, After the Inferno reflects resilience, perseverance, and remembrance. “

Release day’s on Tuesday! If you live in Seattle you can get physical copies at Georgetown Records, Sonic Boom, Easy Street and all Silver Platters locations (SoDo, Northgate and Bellevue). If you’re outside of Seattle you can get it at our CD Baby Music Store, via iTunes or on Knick Knack Records‘ website.

Or you can buy it directly from us at our CD Release Party at the Columbia City Theater next Friday. Get tickets now ’cause they’re going quick.

Track Six – “Grifter’s Life”!

This song goes back almost to the beginning of the band and definitely has more of our “classic” sound to it than the other tracks on the record. It’s taken almost a decade to commit the song to record but we’ve finally done it. This one is always a hit live and you can see why. Music to drunkenly stomp around to. Hope you dig it.

We’re less than two weeks away from release day and this is the second to last track that we’ll be previewing prior to the release date. On Tuesday, September 9th, we’ll be offering a special iTunes pre-sale where you can purchase the album early and it will automatically be downloaded into your iTunes library on Tuesday, September 16. Check back on the 9th for the link to that pre-sale.

Also, be sure to pick up tickets to the CD Release party here. They’re going fast.

Thanks to the Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange for the great review!

Yet another stellar review of After the Inferno courtesy of Mark S. Tucker of the Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange blog. Less than four weeks away from the release date everyone!

The Bad Things - After the Inferno

A review written for the Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange
by Mark S. Tucker

I’ve said it before, but let me repeat it once more: one of the best things I did in the last decade was sign into FAME as a critic. After 30 years writing mainly for assholes, and one or two fairly nice guys along the way, Big Dave Pyles gave me what I asked for: complete freedom to do as I damn well please, and from that—after departing the realm of progrock, avant-garde, outside jazz, and so on, sick to death of idiot publishers, editors, and fellow crits while strongly desiring to get back and re-invest my affinities for bluegrass, folk, and blues while never surrendering my imperishable love for outside fare—I soon came to the attention of a number of savvy PR people and was supplied musics that completely revivified my flagging spirit, musics precisely like The Bad Things’ After the Inferno, stuff I would never have run across otherwise. So thanks Dave, all ‘y’all PR peeps, and especially the musicians who have produced such wondrous fare for such thirsty ears as mine and the FAME readers’. Siiiiiigh!!

And The Bad Things are, well, uh…hmmm, lemme typify them in frontman Jimmy “The Pickpocket” Berg’s own words:

“We’ve ventured into new musical styles, and all our lives have changed. We’ve lost loved ones, some of us had to quit drinking, and I’ve become a parent, so After the Inferno is aptly titled. It’s a rebirth for us. We’re going into a future that’s not easily pigeonholed, and we prefer it that way.”

He’s not exaggerating. He and the lads have concocted a blend of folk, jazz, country, jug, cabaret, rough pop, Balkan, and God only knows what else to come up with a sound that would go exceedingly well with a number of my favorite groups in this bandwidth: The Carnivaleros, The Woes, The Asylum Street Spankers, and so on, groups in which the roots element is very strong but, just when it rears its beautifully odd Americana head, commences to slipping and sliding everywhichwhere and beyond. That’s not a complaint, it’s a deep compliment. Who the hell needs more chart music? Sure as hell not me.

Berg has one of those odd voices part stage presence, part nerd, part Dylan, part bad boy, but always strangely entertaining, and his ensemble is an aggregate of broken angels quite familiar with the mean streets but also mindful of the presence of redemption amid searing honesty and cynicism snarkily delivered. There’s, thank God, a helluva lot of swearin’, cussin’, stump jumpin, and nasty grumpin’ in After the Inferno, sets of mean-spirited lyrics, one verse after the other, cheek to jowl with a honky-tonk, terbacky-spittin’, barn raisin’, fuck-you-and-the-goat-you-rode-in-on spirit, all and sundry gritty, sly, and rambunctious. You’ll hear ‘Murrican, Mezzican, Balkan, klezmeric, and other refrains in the sextet’s music strains, all nailed together in The Bad Things’ iconoclastic perambulations.

This really is no-nonsense rousty music simultaneously pissed as hell while amused with itself, the result an unusually American amalgamation of everything Berg could lay his hands on, as long as it had rime and dust, an evocation of how the bread basket came to metropolis and then reversed the flow. It’s as rednecky and dirt encrusted as 1950 and then as moderne as two minutes ago, finding ground that quakes and steams, roils and smokes, then discomforts, irritates, and bemuses, banjos, mandos, sousaphones, ‘cordines, and various implements of elegant tomfoolery wailing away as you fret and fume, guffaw and lament, choke and chortle…and come away only wanting more.

And, Matthew Forss from the Inside World Music blog had this to say:

With many lineup changes and tragedies over the years, The Bad Things seem to rise up from the ashes of the past with their latest recording, After The Inferno. The Seattle-based group combines a quirky, alt-pop, and a fusion medley of musical styles and instruments throughout the album. The music takes on a gypsy, cabaret, country, folk, and punk characteristic that is highly-creative, unique, and memorable. The slow and emotive “Green Grass,” is a classic folk and country tune with alternative leanings and beautiful back-up vocals. The gypsy rave hit, “Grifter’s Life,” is a rollicking tune with great vocals and a danceable rhythm lead by accordion, horns, and percussion. With song elements bordering on folk, alternative, and indescribable, The Bad Things know how to create music with soul and substance. There are a few similarities to Neutral Milk Hotel. Get it today.

 

The Reviews Are Coming In!

So, the reviews are starting to come in about the new record and they’ve been really positive. Check it out:

THE BAD THINGS ARE ANYTHING BUT

A decade into their career, Seattle’s Bad Things are still one of the city’s best kept musical secrets. While the word Seattle conjures some obvious musical images, The Bad Things are happily not one of them. This gang of outcasts celebrate their uniqueness and outsider status with a fairly interesting approach to music that has more in common with Beirut than with Nirvana. Their latest album, After The Inferno is a tribute to their standing within the coffee capital’s musical community. 

Sounding like something from a different century, Bad Things have old world charm by the bucket load. They sound aged, traditional, unusual, and most importantly…cool. There are polka rhythms, accordion songs, horns, chants and a worldly approach to writing a song and not an ounce of flannel in sight. After The Inferno is unusually brilliant because it’s pure and honest and different. It’s just not modern in a 21st century way and I love how the band have found this neat little niche in which to explore old musical styles that often aren’t heard. The Bad Things ability to mix folk, traditional country, Eastern European, Western European, and quirky pop influences into something so mesmerizing makes it almost impossible to turn away from much less dislike.

After The Inferno is the kind of record you’d hear on a steam ship, river boat, or expedition. It’s an exploratory and rootsy record that keeps traditional sounds close to it’s heart. The Bad Things are honest and awesome musicians and their name is a complete misnomer, because their albums are far from being Bad Things. Seriously awesome old timey music that even your parents and grand parents will like After The Inferno is highly recommended.

Pretty great. That was from The Pop! Stereo Review Roundup. Here’s another from the Midwest Record.

Big Al Brewing on Saturday

Here it is already. Our last show of the summer and our last show until the big ‘ol CD Release festivities in September.

This Saturday, August 9, we’ll be playing a free, all-ages show at Big Al Brewing in White Center. I think this is our third or fourth time playing Big Al’s and it’s always a blast. This year we’re actually playing their 6th Anniversary Party, so there will be even more reason to celebrate. We’ll also have our friend Alana filling in on bass. You may know her from such Seattle institutions as Miss Mamie Lavona & Her White Boy Band and L’Orchestre d’Incroyable. Mad Wilcox is down in Black Rock City helping build the monstrosity that is Burning Man.